The Blogging A to Z Challenge: An Unsanctioned Imitation – Day 1: A is for Attitude

A.D. Duling’s first post from the 2013 April Blogging A to Z Challenge was delivered to my inbox yesterday and it got the rusty wheels in my head whirring. I need a blog-cation. Between writing my eSeries fiction for BigWorldNetwork.com and the upcoming summer of focused insanity slinging smoothies for my Maui Wowi Hawaiian Coffees & Smoothies business, I have a lot on my plate. I need to get organized. But, I’ve recently met some wonderful writers and readers and was even able to con a few into following my blog. The last thing I want to do is to take a hiatus and leave my new friends dangling without a dose of TotallyTawn for a whole month. That’s a sure way to allow any kind of relationships I’ve been fortunate enough to cultivate to wither and die.

When I first began blogging, I had no idea where to begin, so I decided to work my way through the alphabet and see how it went. With the serendipitous timing A.D. Duling’s first post of the Blogging A to Z Challenge, I’ve decided to drag those posts from the TotallyTawn blog attic, dust them off, and share them with those of you who have just joined me so that I can concentrate on getting caught up on my work. Viola! The TotallyTawn Blogging A to Z Unsanctioned Imitation is born!

For April 1, 2012, please enjoy my (slightly revised) post “A is for Attitude”:

This is something I know quite a bit about, since I’ve been accused of everything from having a good attitude, a bad attitude, and/or simply a lot of ‘tude. From a flight perspective, attitude is the orientation of the craft about it’s center of mass. In a way, it’s a measurement of equilibrium. I think a person’s attitude is the same – a measurement of equilibrium. If you have a bad attitude, events seem to never go your way. But if you have a good attitude, things just seem to click into place without any real effort on your part.

So, how do we keep a good attitude? It’s just like flying a plane (or driving a car, or riding a bike): you keep an eye on it and when you see it going off course, you fix it right away with a small adjustment to keep it from deviating even more. And that small adjustment can be anything. Try it. Take a look in the mirror, make the goofiest face you can think of at yourself, and smile. If that doesn’t give your attitude a bump in the right direction, have a nice glass of wine and call me in the morning.